endwarhugmore

中原大佛 (Zhongyuan Dafo) Spring Temple Buddha, Lushan, China (currently the tallest statue in the world)

& 南海观音 (Nanhai Guanyin) Guanyin of the South Sea, Sanya, China (currently the 4th tallest)

(Source: mingsonjia, via nzurianne)

merakitea:

boyexemplified:

sleepy-socialist:

vivelamours:

The Black Power Mixtape 1967-1975 (2011), Göran Hugo Olsson

You heard it right folks, the FBI considered free breakfasts for poor children to be the most dangerous internal threat to the country. Literally the kind of thing Jesus would do was the most dangerous threat to the country.

It’s not surprising, considering Hoover was a vile racist piece of shit who lost sleep at night thinking about poor people not being miserable or dead.

Afeni Shakur started that though. Please give the ladies of the Panther Movement their props.

(via thegirlwithcaramelskin)

dopetivity128:

tsunamistorms:

just-enjoy-this-shiit:

 





MJ got that real nigga dap lol

The baddest man around

MJ was a real nigga, though.

MJ is from Gary goddamn Indiana. I’ll put money on him being able to throw them hands on the low.

You know Joe wasn’t about to raise no punks letting other people push them around. Joe looks like the type of daddy to say “either you fight him or you fight me.”


I think he was ^

 i second that emotion. 

franso

dopetivity128:

tsunamistorms:

just-enjoy-this-shiit:

 

MJ got that real nigga dap lol

The baddest man around

MJ was a real nigga, though.

MJ is from Gary goddamn Indiana. I’ll put money on him being able to throw them hands on the low.

You know Joe wasn’t about to raise no punks letting other people push them around. Joe looks like the type of daddy to say “either you fight him or you fight me.”

I think he was ^

 i second that emotion. 

franso

(Source: thathipsterporn, via nzurianne)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Eliza Bennett

A Woman’s Work is Never Done

A series of photographic works titled ‘A Woman’s Work is Never Done’ Using my own hand as a base material, I considered it a canvas upon which I stitched into the top layer of skin using thread to create the appearance of an incredibly work worn hand.  By using the technique of embroidery, which is traditionally employed to represent femininity and applying it to the expression of its opposite, I hope to challenge the pre-conceived notion that ‘women’s work’ is light and easy.  Aiming to represent the effects of hard work arising from employment in low paid ‘ancillary’ jobs, such as cleaning, caring and catering, all traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. 

The technique, I recall first applying to my hand under a table during a home economics class in school. I was totally amazed to find that I could pass a needle under the top layers of skin without any pain, only a mild discomfort.  As with many childhood whims it passed and I hadn’t thought any more about it until quite recently when I decided to apply the process to my hand to make it appear calloused and work worn like that of a manual labourer. Some viewers consider the piece to be a feminist protest, for me it’s about human value. After all, there are many men employed in caring, catering, cleaning etc… all jobs traditionally considered to be ‘women’s work’. Such work is invisible in the larger society, with ‘A woman’s work’ I aim to represent it.  (artist statement)

Website

(via raw-r-evolution)

Style has a profound meaning to Black Americans. If we can’t drive, we will invent walks and the world will envy the dexterity of our feet. If we can’t have ham, we will boil chitterlings; if we are given rotten peaches, we will make cobblers; if given scraps, we will make quilts; take away our drums, and we will clap our hands. We prove the human spirit will prevail. We will take what we have to make what we need. We need confidence in our knowledge of who we are.

Nikki Gionvanni

File this under facts on facts.

This makes me think of a beautiful post that I mentioned in one of my Read This Week features; a post by @HarrietThugman about Black people of other cultural backgrounds who diminish Black American culture, and shouldn’t….for it is so rich.

My cultural heritage involves a mixture of my love for some things specific to Jamaican culture (because of my background, being raised in a Jamaican family by Jamaican parents, but being raised in America and actually born in America) and some things specific to being an American Black (I love how Nikki says Black is the NOUN and American is the adjective), and some things that seems to connect Black people despite where in the diaspora we are.

(via gradientlair)

Yes!!!

(via goldacrylicnails)

(via akir)